Recipe: Reine-Claude Coffee Cake

Reine Claude

What are Reine-Claudes? Maybe you know them as Greengages? Now after two years of living in French-speaking Switzerland, I finally discovered these little green plums with a sweet fresh flavor. Typically grown in southern France, we see Reine-Claudes at our farmers’ market and all the local grocery stores. Their size can vary, but most often they’re smaller than purple plums (pruneaux) and slightly larger than the yellow-hued Mirabelles.

Reine Claudes market

Reine Claude
Named after a 16th century French queen, these special Reine-Claudes have a distinct flavor and are really best eaten raw. Even so, I’m not a huge fan of plums—although I’m slowly acquiring a taste for them. Generally, I prefer them baked in a cake or tart.

Over the last few weeks of summer vacation (my son’s school year started on Monday already!?), I’ve been perfecting my recipe for a cake with Reine-Claudes. When I served my second test-cake to my father-in-law last week, he suggested calling it a coffee cake, given it’s overall appearance and texture. I agreed with him, and since I’m usually downing a large cup of coffee (or several) when eating cake, it seemed like a good name for my new recipe. I had lots of coffee cake growing up in Minnesota, and this one reminds me of one my mother used to make with a cinnamon-streusel topping—except it’s made without dairy and contains French plums befitting a queen!


Reine-Claude Coffee Cake

Inspired by Smitten Kitchen’s Purple Plum Torte, a recipe adapted from Marian Burros’ Famous Purple Plum Torte from Elegant but Easy and The Essential New York Times Cookbook.

Tools:
A 9-inch round cake tin or springform pan
Parchment paper and/or dairy-free margarine for greasing the pan

Dry ingredients:
1 cup all-purpose flour
3 tablespoons ground almonds (optional)
1 teaspoon baking powder
1/8 teaspoon salt

Wet ingredients:
3/4 cup sugar
1/2 cup dairy-free margarine, softened
1 teaspoon vanilla sugar (or vanilla extract)
2 large eggs
Zest of 1 lemon

Topping:
About 8 Reine-Claudes (Greengages), pitted and halved
2 teaspoons fresh lemon juice
2 tablespoons sugar
1 teaspoon ground cinnamon
1-2 tablespoons sliced almonds (optional)

1. Whisk together the dry ingredients in a small bowl. Set aside.

2. In a large bowl, beat together the sugar, vanilla sugar and margarine. Add one egg at a time, and combine until the mixture is smooth. Then stir in the lemon zest.

3. Add the dry ingredients to the wet ingredients in two batches, stirring together gently until combined, but do not overbeat. Put the cake batter into the prepared pan, spread evenly.

4. Place the Reine-Claudes face down and evenly dispersed on top of the cake batter. Then, sprinkle the lemon juice over the plums and the cake batter.

Reine Claude Cake

5. Combine the sugar and cinnamon and sprinkle it over the top of the cake. Finally, sprinkle on the sliced almonds.

Reine Claude Cake

6. Bake for 40-50 minutes at 180ºC/350ºF until a toothpick inserted in the center of the cake comes out clean. Best served warm, but also very good the next day!

Reine Claude Cake

Reine-Claude Coffee Cake Piece 2702x2794

We’ve had a cool and rainy Swiss summer, so I’m hoping for a warm autumn season. Hope you’re all doing well and enjoying the final weeks of summer.


Allergy-Friendly Restaurants in Switzerland: Seeking Your Recommendations

allergy-friendly mealDairy/egg-free meal at Grindelwald’s Hotel Belvedere

During a rare meal out at a restaurant last month, my son raised up his arms and cheered loudly at the table—with a fork in one hand and a knife in the other. He really liked his fish, and was pretty excited about having a meal in a restaurant. Although, I can’t help but wonder if he was just glad to not be eating my cooking! Either way, it was a nice moment on our vacation that I won’t soon forget.

Have you ever been served a delicious allergy-friendly meal, carefully prepared by a restaurant in Switzerland? This most recent meal was at the Hotel Belvedere‘s restaurant in Grindelwald. With a lot of advanced preparation and emails back and forth, my son enjoyed a safe meal made without dairy and eggs. We were all very happy to be there—even though I can never fully relax when my son eats a meal I didn’t prepare myself.

Based on our experiences, and those of others living and traveling with food allergies in Switzerland, I’m constantly adding to my list of allergy-friendly restaurants and accommodations. For example, I just received an email last week with a new restaurant recommendation for Zurich: Widder Restaurant.

If you have places to recommend, please leave a comment below or send me an email. We can learn so much from each other. This information is helpful to our family and for so many others living with food allergies and intolerances. I really appreciate your help!

I’ll be offline for the next two weeks until school starts, as we’re taking a short vacation with family visiting from the United States. As usual, I hope to discover some new Swiss foods while we’re traveling. Thanks to you all for your continued support!


Recipe: Petits Pains for Swiss National Day

Petits Pains

Every year on August 1, Switzerland celebrates Swiss National Day. Here in Suisse romande, we know this holiday as Fête nationale or 1er août. Given the Swiss affinity for bread, it’s not surprising that there’s a special bun prepared for the holiday. Known as August-weggen (German), Pain du 1er août (French) or Panino del 1° agosto (Italian), the small and large versions are cut and baked to look like there’s a Swiss cross on top. They’re typically decorated with a small paper version of the red and white Swiss flag.

This year marks our first time celebrating Fête Nationale in Switzerland. Our first year here, we arrived one day after the celebration on Saturday, August 2, 2012. Now I understand why everything was so quiet the morning we drove from the airport in Zurich to our new home! The Swiss were sleeping in after a day of local celebrations and feasting—traditionally an outdoor brunch at a local farm—and watching fireworks late into the evening.

Instead of heading to a farm for a local brunch on Friday—which would undoubtedly have tables heaped with delicious Swiss cheeses and other milk and egg-filled dishes—we’re choosing to have our own picnic and bonfire at a local park. We’ll be roasting cervalas, often referred to as the Swiss national sausage, as well as marshmallows, to give our celebration an American twist. I’ll also be serving my own version of Petits Pains du 1er août, but mine will be made without dairy.


Rütli Meadow: The Birthplace of Switzerland

To give you some background, Swiss National Day commemorates the founding of Switzerland in 1291. The story goes that the leaders of three cantons—Schwyz, Unterwalden and Uri—came together at the Rütli Meadow to form a strategic alliance. The pact made by these three original cantons ultimately led to the formation of Switzerland and the 26 cantons we know today (there’s a great video from Swissinfo.ch with some beautiful images of Rütli and more detailed info about its history).

We visited the Rütli Meadow earlier this month when we stayed a few nights in Brunnen (as an aside, we had a pleasant stay at the Hotel Schmid & Alfa, which has a few apartments with kitchens, so we could make our own meals). From Brunnen, we took a 10-minute ferry ride across Lake Lucerne to Rütli. During our visit to this historic site with incredible views, only a few other families crossed our path. We had a peaceful time exploring the pristine meadow, seeing happy Swiss cows and having a snack at the picnic area (that’s shown in the video above). If you’re in the vicinity, it’s certainly worth a stop.

Rutli MeadowThe view from Rütli Meadow

Swiss National Day started in 1891, but it became a federal holiday over a century later in 1994. Also, the Swiss didn’t start making Pain du 1er août until 1959, when it was invented by the Swiss national association for bakers and confectioners. The small version of the buns are very similar to Petits Pains au Lait, except they have a patriotic shape cut into the top.

Bakery petits pains 2152x1757.17Pain du 1er août in a Suisse romande bakery window

DSC05862Pain du 1er août (even a chocolate version) at the supermarket


Petits Pains for Swiss National Day

Recipe adapted from one of my favorite Suisse romande bloggers, Delimoon

(dairy/nut-free, can be made without egg)

Makes 8 rolls

500 grams all-purpose flour
2 teaspoons sugar
1 teaspoon salt
300 ml soy or rice milk,
very warm
7 grams (2 1/4 teaspoons) active dry yeast

60 grams dairy-free margarine, softened
1 egg,
beaten (or 1-2 tablespoons dairy-free margarine, melted and cooled)

1. Whisk together the first three ingredients in a large bowl. Add the softened margarine. Set aside.

2. Add yeast to the warmed soy or rice milk, along with a pinch of sugar. Gently stir and let sit for a few minutes until the yeast has dissolved and the mixture begins to foam slightly.

3. Pour the yeast mixture into the large bowl with the flour mixture and margarine. Stir until a dough forms. Knead the dough for 10 minutes, stopping when it becomes smooth and elastic.

4. Let the dough rise for about 1 to 1-1/2 hours. Punch down the dough and cut into 8 equal pieces. Shape the pieces into round buns and set on a baking sheet lined with parchment paper. Cover the buns with plastic wrap and let them rise for another 30 minutes.

5. With a pastry brush, gently brush on the egg wash (or melted margarine). Then, using kitchen shears or a very sharp knife, make cuts into the dough that resemble the cross on the Swiss flag.

DSC06016

6. Bake the buns for 20-30 minutes at 200°C/400°F. Remove and tap the bottoms. If they sound hollow, then they’re done. Place on a wire rack to cool.

DSC06018

Happy Swiss National Day! We’re looking forward to a 3-day weekend. Thanks so much for visiting my blog. Bon week-end, all!


Baked Milk Food Challenge: Refusing to Eat

I have a really hard time hiding my emotions. Yesterday morning, in particular, was challenging for me. After finishing off two small pieces of cake made with powdered milk, my 3-year old suddenly refused to eat another bite during his food challenge. We had to stop the test. After only two doses, even though he didn’t have a reaction, the results were inconclusive because he wouldn’t eat all five doses. While I tried to remain upbeat and cheerful, my frustration was clearly visible.

Food challenge doses

This was his fourth food challenge, so we all knew the routine pretty well. Of all the scenarios I considered, my son refusing to eat wasn’t one of them. All of us kept talking about how wonderful the food challenge would be, since my son would get to eat cake during the test. Compared to his 3-year check-up a few weeks earlier—which required a painful finger-prick for a blood sample and a vaccination injected in his thigh—the baked milk food challenge would be so much easier.


Signs of Trouble

Once at the hospital though, the signs of trouble appeared early on. First, I was disappointed to learn the cake contained chestnut flour, instead of an all-purpose flour made from wheat. My son doesn’t have a wheat allergy or gluten intolerance, but this was apparently the standard cake the hospital used for a baked milk challenge. While I didn’t mind the taste of the cake, my finicky son wasn’t loving it.

While his first small piece of cake went down relatively easily, the second almost made him vomit. As he started lurching, the doctor quickly grabbed a bowl for him. Thankfully it stayed down, but I started wondering how he could possible manage the final and largest dose, if such a small piece caused this type of response.

For the third dose, the nurse suggested crumbling the cake and mixing it with applesauce. We did this during his food challenge with baked egg, and he gladly ate it up. Today was different though. When the spoon was presented, he refused to open his mouth. He really didn’t want to eat it, but at the same time, he had a little sparkle in his eyes, like we were playing a game—and he was winning. Did I mention our son is 3 years old?

We waited an hour after the second dose with all of us attempting to feed him the cake and applesauce mixture. Airplane spoons were flying into his mouth. I tried dancing and singing with him, while sneaking in a spoonful. His older brother even tried to help out. Nothing worked, and so the doctor said we should stop. You can’t force someone to eat, and our attempts just seemed to strengthen his determination.


How often does this happen?

According to my son’s pediatric allergist, this certainly wasn’t the first time a child refused to eat during a food challenge. It happens—especially with kids around our son’s age. I poked around for some data on the prevalence of situations like ours, but haven’t come across any yet. I’m curious about this, so if you have any info—either stories from your own experiences or quantitative data from a peer-reviewed journal article, for example, please let me know.


Next Steps

In 6 months, my son will repeat the food challenge for baked milk—except this time I may be bringing a homemade cake. The pediatric allergist will be sending a recipe, so I’ll practice it a few times with all-purpose flour, along with a little cocoa powder or some Enjoy Life chocolate chips. I’ll do whatever it takes to make sure we don’t have the same result!

In the meantime, while we’re waiting to redo the test, we’ll be scheduling another food challenge for raw/undercooked egg as soon as possible. We’ve already been serving our son lots of foods containing baked eggs, so I’m really hoping for a negative test result in the coming months.

Have you ever repeated a food challenge because your child refused to eat? If you have any advice to share with us and others about food challenges with children, please leave a comment below or send me an email. Thanks in advance for your help!


Recipe: Lemon “Ricotta” Pancakes

Lemon Ricotta Pancakes 2713x2971

My oldest son—who doesn’t have food allergies, had previously stopped eating the vegan pancakes I made for his brother. He claimed to no longer like ANY pancakes. Thankfully, he’s changed his mind in the last few weeks. With a new ingredient, I’ve developed a recipe that both my sons really like: Lemon “Ricotta” Pancakes sans dairy, eggs and nuts.


MozzaRisella Vegan Cheese

While I don’t usually share recipes that call for specific brands of food products, I make an exception when I find something really great, especially if it could be helpful to others living with food allergies. My latest discovery here in Switzerland is MozzaRisella—a vegan cheese made from germinated brown rice. I’ve seen it in our small Swiss city at several bio (organic) shops, and I know you can also find it in the UK.

MozzaRisella1 3098x2370

We started buying MozzaRisella to make dairy-free pizza for our son. Compared to the frozen pizza with fake cheese we tried last summer in the US, the homemade pizza with MozzaRisella is so much better. This product even tastes good uncooked and straight from the package. My boys and I were sampling pieces last night when I was making pizza again, and my 3-year old with food allergies kept asking for more.

In addition to pizza, we also tried using MozzaRisella for nachos. I would have never considered this before, but we recently had nachos with mozzarella at our local Swiss-Mexican restaurant. We hadn’t made nachos for years, but during the World Cup, we ate dairy-free nachos with black beans and corn and topped with cilantro and thinly sliced radishes. Not as good as ones made with real cheese, but still an excellent alternative.

The Italian company that makes MozzaRisella also makes CreamyRisella, but I didn’t start buying this other product right away. Then, The Kitchn posted their easy recipe for Fluffy Ricotta Pancakes, and I wondered about using the CreamyRisella as a substitute for the ricotta. It worked from the start, and with a few other modifications, I now have a pancake that even my oldest son will eat. On Sunday, I served them for brunch with fresh raspberries and a side of bacon.


Lemon “Ricotta” Pancakes

Serves 3-4 people

(dairy/egg/nut-free)

3 tablespoons freshly squeezed lemon juice mixed with 1 tablespoon flax meal
1 package of CreamyRisella (200 grams)
2 tablespoons canola oil
2 tablespoons sugar
1 teaspoon cider vinegar
1/2 teaspoon vanilla sugar (or vanilla extract)
zest of 2 lemons
1 cup flour
1 teaspoon baking powder
1/2 teaspoon baking soda
1/8 teaspoon salt
1 1/4 cup soy or rice milk (I’ve been using Alnatura’s Soja Drink-Vanille from Migros)

1. In a large bowl, stir together the lemon juice and the flax meal and set aside for a few minutes.

2. Then, add the next six ingredients to the flax meal mixture and whisk together until smooth: CreamyRisella, oil, sugar, cider vinegar, vanilla sugar and lemon zest.

3. Whisk together the dry ingredients in a separate bowl. Next, gently whisk the dry ingredients into the wet ingredients in about 2 batches, alternating with the soy or rice milk. Do not overbeat.

4. Using a measuring cup, pour pancake batter on a medium-high heated skillet. Flip the pancake once air bubbles throughout the pancake begin to burst. Cook about 1-3 minutes on each side, until light golden brown, and serve warm.

Lemon Ricotta Pancakes 2 2736x2726
Full disclosure: This is not a sponsored post, nor did I receive any compensation. The opinions expressed on this blog are solely my own.

What’s your favorite vegan cheese? Have you tried MozzaRisella? I’m curious to hear about other vegan cheeses in Switzerland and beyond. Please leave a comment below or send me an email. Thanks!


Comparing Milk Substitutes: Coop and Migros

When I was a kid, I would drink a large glass of cold milk with every meal. Unfortunately, my son can’t do the same because of his milk allergy. Instead, we give him soy milk fortified with calcium. Thankfully, he loves the stuff. At the same time though, I’m always looking for new brands that have a perfect combination of nutrition, taste and an affordable price.

Alnatura Products 2355x2676.13

So, when Migros sent me a complimentary box of Alnatura’s organic products for my family to try—including several different kinds of milk substitutes—it seemed like a good time to to reevaluate which milk substitute is best for my son. Migros recently started offering Alnatura products via its home-delivery site, LeShop.ch, and in selected stores. Here’s what I’ve compiled so far to compare the milk substitutes from two major Swiss supermarkets—Migros and Coop—based on a review of their websites today: July 11, 2014.


Dairy-Free Milk Substitutes: Coop and Migros

Product type Coop Migros

Almond Milk

None listed isola Bio Mandorla Boisson aux amandes Bio, 1 liter
(reg. 4.80 CHF, on sale for 3.90 CHF)
Oat Milk Coop Naturaplan Bio Boisson à l’avoine, 1 liter
(Not available online; price not listed)
Alnatura Drink avoine (hafer) et calcium or natur, 1 liter
(2.30 CHF)
Quinoa Milk Naturaplan Bio Max Havelaar Boisson de quinoa & riz
1
liter (3.50 CHF)quinoa_drinkCOOP 2351x3137.28
None listed
Rice Milk-Calcium None listed Alnatura Drink riz calcium, 1 liter (2.30 CHF)

Isola Bio, Boisson au riz Nature – avec calcium
, 1 liter
(reg. 3.50 CHF, on sale for 2.80 CHF)
Rice Milk-Nature Naturaplan Bio Boisson au riz nature, 1 liter (3.30 CHF)Boisson au riz_coop aha Boisson au riz, 5 dl
(1.65 CHF)
reisdrinkMIGROS 2168x2892.56
Isola Bio, Lait végétal à base de riz nature
, 1 liter
(reg. 3.40 CHF, on sale for 2.70 CHF)
Rice Milk with Almond Coop Naturaplan Bio Boisson au riz amandes, 1 liter (3.40 CHF)riceMilkALMONDCOOP 2255x3137.22 Bio Boisson au riz-Amandes, 1 liter
(2.80 CHF)

Isola Bio Boisson à base de riz-Amande, 1 liter
(reg. 3.80 CHF, on sale for 2.90 CHF)
Spelt Milk None listed Alnatura Drink à l’épeautre (dinkel) natur and calcium,
1 liter (2.90 CHF)dinkel_drinkMIGROS 2081x3233.24
Soy Milk-Calcium Sojasun Soya drink avec calcium, 1 liter (3.45 CHF)CoopSoyMilk_calcium 2214x3264.59 Alnatura Drink soja et calcium, 1 liter (1.60 CHF) 

Soja Line aha – Drink Boisson au soja avec du calcium 100% végétal, 1 liter (1.90 CHF)soymilk

Soy Milk-Nature Naturaplan Bio Drink au soja nature, 1 liter (1.90 CHF)CoopSoyMilknaturaplan
Sojasun Soya drink nature, 1 liter (2.20 CHF)SoyMilk_NaturCoop 2341x3096.02
Alnatura Drink au soja nature, 1 liter (1.60 CHF)SoyMilkNatur_Migros 2026x3233.10
Soja Line aha – Drink Boisson Bio nature-100% végétal
, 1 liter (1.90 CHF) 

Soyana Soy Drink, Boisson à base de fèves de soya bio Original,
1 liter (3.20 CHF)

Soy Milk-Vanille None listed Alnatura Drink soja vanille, 1 liter (1.90 CHF)soymilkVANILLE 1802x3218.28

Please note: I focused on the more typical milk substitutes intended as beverages (e.g., those beverages marked with “Drink”). Also, I have not included lactose-free milk substitutes that include other forms of dairy or chocolate-flavored milk substitutes. Finally, the actual selection of these products can vary at each individual store.

Full disclosure: I received a complimentary box of Alnatura products from Migros, as shown in the photo above. However, I did not receive any compensation from Coop or Migros, and any opinions expressed in this or any of my other posts are solely my own.

We have a grocery order arriving at our home this evening, so we’ll be doing some taste tests this weekend. What are your favorite milk substitutes in Switzerland? Bon week-end, everyone!


Is there a Shortage of Adrenaline Auto-Injectors in Switzerland?

EpiPen and Trainer 2456x2496

No, there isn’t a shortage for the moment. However, the supply of adrenaline auto-injectors (AAIs) in Switzerland has been limited recently, due to defects found last fall in one of the two available brands here. According to an official from Swissmedic—the Swiss federal agency responsible for authorizing and supervising therapeutic products—the situation may be more accurately described as “an undersupply,” and it’s improving.

The issue of a potential shortage first came to my attention in January 2014, when I picked up a new prescription for EpiPens because our son’s were expiring. I brought them home from the pharmacy to discover they would expire in May 2014—only a 5-month shelf-life. We had to request a new prescription from our son’s allergist again this spring. I wanted to know more about why this occurred, especially since a typical shelf-life for EpiPens is about 13-14-months—a fact I learned this week via email from a representative of MEDA, the company that distributes this brand in Europe. Also, I’ve been reading about similar situations in the United States via the food allergy blog, Oh Mah Deehness!, and in the United Kingdom via Anaphylaxis Campaign.

Please note: In the United States, from my experience, AAIs are more commonly referred to as epinephrine auto-injectors.

What are AAIs?

We always carry two AAIs with us because our son has severe food allergies. If he had a life-threatening allergic reaction, known as anaphylaxis, we would need to inject him with a dose (or more) of adrenaline. Some symptoms of anaphylaxis can include skin reactions and difficulty breathing. While we’ve thankfully never had to use them, we need to make sure we’re carrying AAIs that haven’t expired.

For more detailed information about AAIs, check out “About Food Allergies: Epinephrine Auto-injectors” via Food Allergy Research & Education’s website.


What brands of AAIs are available in Switzerland?

In Switzerland, people who need AAIs have two options: EpiPen or Jext (see the table note below). Anapen has also been licensed in Switzerland, but hasn’t been available since a product recall in 2012, and it’s not known when it will be available again, based on an email response I received from aha! Swiss Allergy Centre. Here’s a quick comparison of the two available AAIs in Switzerland:

Characteristics EpiPen Jext*
Types of AAI EpiPen Jr and EpiPen Jext 150 and Jext 300
Shelf-life 18 months 24 months
Training device Yes Yes
Refill reminder system Yes (My EpiPen and My EpiPen App) Yes (Expiry Alert Service)
Distributor MEDA Pharma GmbH ALK-Abelló AG

*While the Jext 150 and Jext 300 haven’t been available during the first half of 2014 in Switzerland, a Swissmedic official emailed me on July 10 to report that new lots of the product are expected in July 2014.


What caused a batch recall of Jext AAIs?

In November 2013, there was a batch recall of Jext 150 and Jext 300 in Switzerland. It was discovered that in rare cases, a defect would prevent the adrenaline from being administered properly for certain batches of these products.

 

How did the recall affect the supply of AAIs in Switzerland?

The batch recall meant the retail sector (i.e., pharmacies) had to return their supply of Jext that could potentially have the defect. At the same time, patients with Jext were informed to keep them, since the probability of a malfunction was very low, and based on a November 2013 notice from Swissmedic, a replacement of AAIs could not be guaranteed due to a limited supply—a situation that was occurring throughout Europe.

To help alleviate the increased demand for AAI in Switzerland, Swissmedic approved the distribution of an “emergency batch” of EpiPens “with a relatively short remaining shelf-life,” according to an agency official there. It provided temporary relief and helped prevent a shortage of this medication. Patients with extremely severe and recurrent allergic reactions that had the potentially defective Jext were allowed to receive another AAI during the recall as a precaution.


What’s the situation now?

EpiPens with a more typical shelf-life are now being made available to patients in Switzerland, according to an agency official from Swissmedic. This matches our family’s experience, as the two AAIs we picked up in May 2014 had an expiration date of June 2015. Furthermore, new lots of Jext should be coming on the market yet this month, as indicated by an Swissmedic official. All of this is good news for people living with food allergies, who depend on this medication if they ever experience a severe allergic reaction.


What kind of AAI have you or your family members been prescribed? How, if at all, have you been affected by the Jext recall? Please share a comment below, when you have the chance. Thanks in advance for your help.

Updated: July 10, 2014


Recipe: Salade Estivale for Summertime

The signs of summer are apparent here in Switzerland. Outdoor music festival season started locally with Festi’neuch. Swiss summer trail racing is also underway, and I’ll be attempting my first one next weekend. Most importantly, my son’s summer vacation from school starts in one week. And in terms of food, I’ve noticed restaurants around town are advertising their summertime salads or salades estivales.

Salade Estival Sign  2736x3648-001

My research indicates there’s no set rule for making a Swiss salade estivale, other than it should contain some sort of fresh summertime vegetables. Since I’m always trying to get my boys to eat more vegetables, we’ll be making lots of salads again during our summer vacation. The first Swiss salad recipe I’ve been making this summer is appropriately named Salade estivale, which I came across a while back in one of my Suisse romande cookbooks.

With seven vegetables to choose from in this salad, my boys tend to pick out the ones they like and leave the rest, but I still try to see it as progress. I was reminded this week by registered dietician Julia Marriott of Alimentary Bites that when it comes to serving vegetables to picky eaters, “perseverance and patience” are the only way. As with many salad recipes, the directions below serve as a guide, so feel free to swap in your favorite vegetables or mess with the quantities a bit, depending on the preferences in your household.


Salade Estivale

Adapted from Les recettes de Grand-Mère, Tome 4. Published in 2010 by the Association Alzheimer Suisse, Yverdon-les-Bains.

(dairy/egg/nut-free)

Salad:
1 cup kohlrabi, peeled and diced
1 cup carrots, peeled and diced
1 cup potatoes or sweet potatoes, peeled and diced
1 cup corn kernels, fresh or frozen
1 cup green beans, chopped
1 cup red pepper, diced
1 cup peas, frozen

Dressing:
4 tablespoons colza/canola/rapeseed oil
3 tablespoons white wine vinegar
2 tablespoons parsley, finely chopped
2 tablespoons chives, finely chopped
1 tablespoon tarragon, finely chopped
1 tablespoon soy yogurt
salt and pepper, to taste

1. Make the dressing. Put all the ingredients in a sealed jar and shake vigorously. Add salt and pepper to taste. Set aside.

2. Cook the vegetables. Bring a pot of water to a rolling boil and cook kohlrabi, carrots and potatoes together until fork tender, about 5-10 minutes. While these vegetables are cooking, use a steamer basket to steam the corn, green beans, red pepper and peas, just until tender. Do not overcook.

3. Put all the warmed vegetables in a large bowl and toss gently with the desired amount of dressing. Sprinkle with some fresh herbs and serve immediately, while still warm.

Salade Estival Sign

 I’m always grateful for the good advice and support of other food allergy parents. Many thanks to you all, and bon week-end!


Recipe: Gâteau St. Honoré with Raspberries

Gâteau St. Honoré with Raspberries 2560x3637

In our corner of Suisse-Romande, there seems to be a local version of the famous French cake—Gâteau St. Honoré. Named after the seventh-century patron saint of bakers, a Parisian pastry chef developed the cake in the 1840s. I first learned about it last month, when the boys and I were walking by my favorite local bakery. The sign out front read “St-honoré aux Framboises,” so I quick popped inside to inquire about the raspberry cake.

Bakery sign 1771x2332.19

Inside the bakery, the lady behind the counter pointed to what looked like a cream pie topped with a crown of whipped cream and glazed raspberries in the middle. Typically, I avoid custard-like desserts and glazed fruit. I don’t like making them, and I’m not a fan of eating them either. I would much rather have a big piece of Bundt cake or a sweet yeasted bread—and hopefully made with some type of chocolate.

Still, I was intrigued to learn more about it, especially given the saintly name. So, I picked up a small gâteau and my oldest son and I shared it after dinner. It was much better than I thought, with the flavors of the different sweet and tart components, along with an almost savory pastry shell, blending together with each bite.

Gâteau St. Honoré 2725x3192

I must mention, however, that some of the Swiss-French Gâteaux St. Honoré differ tremendously from the traditional version of the cake. A true St. Honoré has a ring of cream puffs on top. The French cake is especially popular in May, and particularly on May 16, the day St. Honoré reportedly died.


Allergy-Friendly Shortcuts

One of the reasons I felt more compelled to try making something like this at home was my other recent discovery: Bird’s Custard Powder from the UK. Unlike traditional custard, filled with dairy and eggs, this powder helps to thicken a non-dairy milk into a suitable substitute. To be honest, it took me 3 tries to get it right, with the first two batches going down the drain.

Bird's Custard Powder 2100x2711

Despite all the shortcuts I’ve taken for this Swiss-French Gâteau St. Honoré, like store-bought puff pastry and custard powder, this recipe still takes time. I even bought a pastry bag! I typically avoid recipes with lots of complicated and time-consuming steps, but I had to give this a try. Maybe I’ll make it again next May because the boys liked it so much. I’ll need a full year just to practice my custard and piping techniques!


Gâteau St. Honoré with Raspberries

(dairy/egg-free)

What you’ll need:
Puff pastry, store-bought and pre-made
Custard, chilled (I used Bird’s Custard Powder and followed the directions on the can)
Fresh raspberries
Raspberry jam
Whipped cream, dairy-free (I used soy cream)
Small pie or tart pan
Parchment paper

1. Buy pre-made puff pastry and pre-bake the pastry shells in the desired pans, lined with parchment paper and following the directions on the package.

2. Make custard filling. Use your favorite dairy/egg-free custard recipe, but if you don’t have one, I recommend giving Bird’s Custard Powder a try if you can find it. Cool the custard.

3. Gently warm some raspberry jam on the stove until it thins out a bit. Pass it through a sieve to remove the seeds. Cool and gently coat the raspberries in the jam glaze.

4. Fill the cooled pastry shells with custard. Top with the glazed raspberries.

5. Using a pastry bag, pipe whipped dairy-free cream around the edges of the pastry.

6. Store in the refrigerator or eat them all at once!

Gâteau St. Honore 2 2662x3500. Honore 2662x3500

If you have any dairy/egg-free custard advice, please leave a comment below!

And, have you been watching the World Cup? Switzerland vs. France tonight, so we’ll be tuning in. Bon week-end, everyone!


Third Birthday and Upcoming Food Challenges

Dairy-free birthday cake

Our youngest son turned 3 years old this week. As we celebrate his birthday, there’s a lot to be thankful for in terms of his food allergies. We’ve had some good news this year. Here’s a quick summary:

Now I can use eggs in my son’s birthday cakes. For his party, I opted for a traditional yellow layer cake with a rhubarb swirl and chocolate frosting. The Kitchn has an easy recipe for this traditional birthday cake, which I adapted by using dairy-free margarine and rice milk.

yellow cake 2485x3175

We will be scheduling a food challenge for eggs in the upcoming months. If our son passes this test, he’ll be able to eat scrambled eggs, french toast, frittata and all those other egg-based dishes I’ve been anxiously waiting to make again. To prepare for this challenge, I’m making sure he eats some form of baked egg every day—like dried pasta, homemade cake or bread—to hopefully build up his tolerance and increase the likelihood of him passing the test.

We also have a new testing plan for his milk allergy, developed in partnership with his pediatric allergist. This involves a series of food challenges, starting with baked milk. If there’s a negative result (i.e., no reaction occurs), then we move down the list to the next test, and so on, until he completely outgrows his allergy. If there’s a positive result (i.e., a reaction occurs), then we’ll repeat the test after a certain period of time and hope he eventually passes it.

For each of these food challenges, here’s what he’ll eat:

  1. Baked milk: Cake baked with powdered milk. Looking at the data, there’s a good chance my son will pass this test. For example, a study published in the Journal of Allergy and Clinical Immunology (2011) reported that approximately 75 percent of children with a cow’s milk allergy can tolerate eating foods with baked milk.
  2. Baked yogurt: Cake baked with dairy-based yogurt.
  3. Baked cheese: Pizza baked with cheese on top.
  4. Cold milk: Cold milk or possibly petit suisse again—to be determined.

From what I’ve read, our son has a good chance of outgrowing his milk allergy. I recently came across the milk allergy guidelines from the British Society for Allergy and Clinical Immunology (BSACI), which indicate that the majority of children will resolve their cow’s milk allergy and recommends individuals “be reassessed at 6-12 monthly intervals from 12 months of age to assess for suitability of reintroduction” (p. 643).

Instead of our selected approach, we could have chosen to skip all these additional tests and go straight to the cold milk test for a second time, as our son could outgrow his milk allergy on his own, without any intervention. This was the other option we considered, and it could also work.

Even though my son could outgrow his milk allergy on his own, I’m just too impatient to wait. Plus, the study cited above found that for children, consuming baked milk products can accelerate the resolution of their allergy. Knowing this, our pediatric allergist suggested this incremental approach, and my husband and I agreed with the recommendation. I would much rather actively do something and test these different forms of milk, than wait another year, have the same result and find we can’t make any changes to our son’s diet.

Being able to add powdered milk to baked goods would be such a major improvement, and it may be something we can start doing soon, should my son pass this first test. If so, our family would no longer be living completely dairy-free in Switzerland, so once again, I may have to change the name of this blog (which I would be overjoyed to do!).

Questions: Do you or your child have a cow’s milk allergy? What approach are you taking to try and resolve it? Please leave a comment below or send me an email at dairyfreeswitzerland@gmail.com. If you have a moment to do so, I would really appreciate it.

Many thanks, and bon week-end!


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