Third Birthday and Upcoming Food Challenges

Dairy-free birthday cake

Our youngest son turned 3 years old this week. As we celebrate his birthday, there’s a lot to be thankful for in terms of his food allergies. We’ve had some good news this year. Here’s a quick summary:

Now I can use eggs in my son’s birthday cakes. For his party, I opted for a traditional yellow layer cake with a rhubarb swirl and chocolate frosting. The Kitchn has an easy recipe for this traditional birthday cake, which I adapted by using dairy-free margarine and rice milk.

yellow cake 2485x3175

We will be scheduling a food challenge for eggs in the upcoming months. If our son passes this test, he’ll be able to eat scrambled eggs, french toast, frittata and all those other egg-based dishes I’ve been anxiously waiting to make again. To prepare for this challenge, I’m making sure he eats some form of baked egg every day—like dried pasta, homemade cake or bread—to hopefully build up his tolerance and increase the likelihood of him passing the test.

We also have a new testing plan for his milk allergy, developed in partnership with his pediatric allergist. This involves a series of food challenges, starting with baked milk. If there’s a negative result (i.e., no reaction occurs), then we move down the list to the next test, and so on, until he completely outgrows his allergy. If there’s a positive result (i.e., a reaction occurs), then we’ll repeat the test after a certain period of time and hope he eventually passes it.

For each of these food challenges, here’s what he’ll eat:

  1. Baked milk: Cake baked with powdered milk. Looking at the data, there’s a good chance my son will pass this test. For example, a study published in the Journal of Allergy and Clinical Immunology (2011) reported that approximately 75 percent of children with a cow’s milk allergy can tolerate eating foods with baked milk.
  2. Baked yogurt: Cake baked with dairy-based yogurt.
  3. Baked cheese: Pizza baked with cheese on top.
  4. Cold milk: Cold milk or possibly petit suisse again—to be determined.

From what I’ve read, our son has a good chance of outgrowing his milk allergy. I recently came across the milk allergy guidelines from the British Society for Allergy and Clinical Immunology (BSACI), which indicate that the majority of children will resolve their cow’s milk allergy and recommends individuals “be reassessed at 6-12 monthly intervals from 12 months of age to assess for suitability of reintroduction” (p. 643).

Instead of our selected approach, we could have chosen to skip all these additional tests and go straight to the cold milk test for a second time, as our son could outgrow his milk allergy on his own, without any intervention. This was the other option we considered, and it could also work.

Even though my son could outgrow his milk allergy on his own, I’m just too impatient to wait. Plus, the study cited above found that for children, consuming baked milk products can accelerate the resolution of their allergy. Knowing this, our pediatric allergist suggested this incremental approach, and my husband and I agreed with the recommendation. I would much rather actively do something and test these different forms of milk, than wait another year, have the same result and find we can’t make any changes to our son’s diet.

Being able to add powdered milk to baked goods would be such a major improvement, and it may be something we can start doing soon, should my son pass this first test. If so, our family would no longer be living completely dairy-free in Switzerland, so once again, I may have to change the name of this blog (which I would be overjoyed to do!).

Questions: Do you or your child have a cow’s milk allergy? What approach are you taking to try and resolve it? Please leave a comment below or send me an email at dairyfreeswitzerland@gmail.com. If you have a moment to do so, I would really appreciate it.

Many thanks, and bon week-end!

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2 Comments on “Third Birthday and Upcoming Food Challenges”

  1. Hi Heddi!

    Great news that your son now tolerates baked egg, congratulations! We are three days in to trying our little girl (once again) on the initial stage, with a Malted Milk biscuit. Each time we have tried this, she has never got beyond day three, however, this time is looking good!

    I was interested to see your ‘milk ladder’ broken into four stages. Dr Carina Venter a very highly regarded British dietitian has published a milk ladder that is broken down even further – into about thirteen stages, I believe. It is based on English products, but you may find it interesting/helpful! There is also an accompanying recipe sheet.

    If you’re interested, I can send you the link!

    Hope all goes well and Bon Anniversaire to your little boy!

    xx

    • H. Elise says:

      Hello there! Thank you so much for sharing this info. I’ve never heard of a 13-step milk ladder. I think this is the one you’re referring to? http://ifan.ie/wp-content/uploads/2014/02/Milk-Ladder-2013-MAP.pdf Will have to learn more about this. Curious to hear more about the malted milk biscuit stage too. I hope she gets past day 3 this time! That sounds like great progress for you all, and I hope it continues. As always, so nice connecting with you about all this, and I really appreciate your help. Hope you’re having a great day, and have a wonderful weekend. Best wishes to you and your family, Heddi


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