Swiss Retro Recipe: Riz Casimir

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An easy meal for kids, I’ve created a dairy-free version of a popular Swiss dish from the 1950s: Riz Casimir.

I first discovered Riz Casimir at Zurich’s Hiltl Restaurant in December 2013. When I saw it on the menu, I didn’t realize this curry dish was actually over a half-century old and known throughout Switzerland. Only after trying Hiltl’s vegetarian version did I start noticing this dish in other restaurants and among the prepared meals from Coop and Migros. Finally, after I came across a simple recipe for Riz Casimir in my Swiss cookbook for public schools, Croqu’menus, I decided to try making it myself.

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According to Betty Bossi, Riz Casimir is often mentioned as a favorite dish by people of all ages in Switzerland. The founder of the Mövenpick restaurants, Ueli Prager, developed this recipe in 1952 with ingredients considered exotic for the time: curry, pineapple and banana. Ultimately, it seems Riz Casimir is the Swiss interpretation of Kashmiri Rice, a northern Indian dish.

Instead of using cream, I’ve been making Riz Casimir with coconut milk. I also added a few other ingredients, like fresh garlic and ginger, and some optional toppings, like chopped cashews and cilantro, to give it a little more flavor and texture. My 3-year old isn’t a huge fan of curry, but this is a very mild recipe.

In terms of presentation, I modeled my version after the photo in my Swiss cookbook of a wreath of rice decorated with banana, pineapple and cherries, and the curry nestled in the center. Honestly, it feels a little ridiculous arranging the fruit like this on the platter, but if it helps my finicky kids find it more appealing, I’ll continue to do it!


Riz Casimir

Recipe adapted from Croqu’menus (9th edition, 2005, p. 91).
(dairy-free, egg-free)
Serves 4-5 people

Ingredients:

1-2 teaspoons sunflower or canola oil
2 shallots, finely chopped
1-2 garlic cloves, finely chopped
1 thumb-sized knob of fresh ginger, peeled and finely grated or chopped
4 chicken breasts, sliced into thin and bite-size pieces
100 ml white wine or allergy-friendly chicken/vegetable broth
250 ml coconut milk
1 tablespoon curry powder
1-2 teaspoons cornstarch
salt, to taste

Optional toppings: chopped cilantro and cashews, pineapple rings and apple slices

Serve with hot basmati rice

Instructions:

1. Heat the oil in a large pan over medium-high heat. Saute the shallots, ginger and garlic for a few minutes until tender and fragrant.

2. Cook the chicken for about 5-10 minutes, stirring frequently, until its nearly done. Remove from the pan and set-aside. Add the wine (or chicken/vegetable broth) and simmer for a few minutes.

3. Add the coconut milk and curry powder to the wine in the pan, and whisk it together until well-incorporated.

4. Whisk in the cornstarch and return the chicken to the pan. Simmer for about 5 minutes more until the sauces thickens slightly.

5. Serve immediately with basmati rice and optional toppings.


Recipe: Swiss-French Red Cabbage Salad with Apples and Raisins

It’s that time of year again, when I try to serve more vegetables to my family after weeks and months of feasting on baked goods—and I’m usually the worst offender!

My latest plan involves trying to work vegetables into all three meals, and ideally in at least two dishes. For breakfast, that means scrambled eggs with spinach. At lunch or dinner, we’ll have a salad and steamed green beans with lemon, for example. With more and newer options, I’m hoping my kids’ interest increases so they actually like eating vegetables, instead of viewing them as a necessary evil.

After a recent Sunday walk, I tried out a new a new red cabbage salad recipe from a local Swiss-French cookbook. I served it as part of leisurely brunch during our last day of the holiday break. My husband, who usually HATES mayonnaise, liked this salad. Unprompted, my 7-year old said it tasted good after his first bite. My 3-year old gave it a thumbs up, but I think he really only liked (and ate) the raisins, to be perfectly honest. We’ll keep this cabbage salad in our mealtime rotation, and I’ll have to try another one I saw recently from Migros’ Saison.ch made with orange juice (here’s yet another salad recipe with cabbage, orange and fennel that also looks good).

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Sunday walk on Mount Vully


Salade de Chou Rouge (Red Cabbage Salad)

Recipe adapted from Recettes du terroir neuchâtelois by Francis Grandjean (2002).

(dairy-free, egg-free, nut-free)

Serves 6-8

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Salad:
500 grams red cabbage (about 1 cabbage)
1-2 apples, diced
about 1/2 cup raisins (I like golden raisins)
Optional: finely chopped chives and lettuce leaves

Sauce:
100 ml vegan mayonnaise (use really mayo if you can!)
3 tablespoons sunflower oil
2 tablespoons red wine vinegar
2 tablespoons shallots, finely chopped
2 teaspoons mustard
salt, to taste (I used about 1/2 teaspoon)

Instructions:

1. Slice the cabbage into thin strips and place in a large bowl.

2. Prepare the sauce by whisking together all the ingredients until smooth. Pour the sauce over the cabbage and toss until well-incorporated.

3.Stir in the raisins and diced apple(s). Best served the same day. Top with chopped chives and serve with fresh lettuce leaves, if desired.

For 2015, we have lots to look forward to in terms of managing my son’s milk allergy, like a food challenge next week and starting school in August. I hope you do too! Happy New Year, and Bonne Année, everyone!

Swiss Bread Recipe: Grappe de Miche

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The Swiss bake their bread in all different sizes and shapes, and in Suisse-Romande, there’s a loaf resembling a cluster of grapes—Grappe de Miches. Last weekend, when our small Swiss city celebrated the grape harvest with its annual te des vendanges (wine festival). I noticed two boulangeries with these festive loaves prominently displayed in their windows.

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With the start of October and cooler temperatures on the way, I will start baking again in earnest. This grape-inspired loaf seemed like a good way to kick of the season!


Grappe de Miche

Inspired by the  “Pain blanc en couronne” from Supertoinette.

(dairy, egg, nut and soy-free)

500 grams all-purpose flour
1 teaspoon salt
7 grams of dry active yeast
300 ml of water, very warm
2 tablespoons sunflower oil (plus about 1 tsp. more)

1. Whisk together the flour and salt in a large bowl.

2. In a separate container, add the yeast to the warmed water and set aside for a few minutes to let it dissolve. Stir until it’s completely absorbed in the water.

3. Pour the yeast mixture and the sunflower oil into the large bowl with the flour mixture. Stir together until a dough forms. Knead the dough for about 10 minutes, until it become smooth and elastic.

4. Add about 1 teaspoon of oil to a large bowl, and turn the kneaded dough in the oil mixture. Cover the bowl with a towel or plastic wrap, and let it rise for about an hour, until it’s doubled in size.

5. Next, divide the dough into about 13 pieces. Form 10 round buns of equal proportions as the “grapes.” Arrange them on a baking sheet lined with parchment paper, as shown below, leaving a little room between the buns. Next prepare the decorations (I used a maple leaf cookie cutter and made a small grapevine) and place them on top. Finally, using the remaining dough to make a stem. Cover the loaf with plastic wrap and let it rise again for about 30 minutes.

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6. Sprinkle the loaf generously with flour and bake at approximately 30 minutes at 200ºC/400ºF.

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7. When the top of the loaf is nicely browned and the bottom sounds hollow when tapped, then it’s done. We like eating this when it’s still warm, but the buns can be kept for a day or two, if they’re tightly wrapped in plastic.

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My 3-year old and I had a picnic yesterday with sandwiches made from our Grappe de Miche, while my 7-year old hiked along the lake with his school. I hope you have a wonderful first weekend of October. Bon week-end, all!

Recipe: Swiss Comfort Food—Benedictine Stew from Einsiedeln Abbey

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Public schools don’t provide lunch here in Switzerland, as I’ve mentioned before. Kids either go home for lunch or to a grandparents house, for example, or they participate in an offsite parascolaire program. These programs in our Swiss city pick up kids from school at 11:40 AM, feed them and then bring them back to school by 1:45 PM.

Since I’m still working as a mère au foyer (i.e., stay-at-home mom), my son comes home for lunch. With a fixed amount of time to get him fed and returned to school, I find myself needing to do some meal prep in advance. This way, our time together isn’t too rushed (i.e., I keep my cool and don’t yell as much!), and he’s not late getting back to class.

This week, I wanted to share a very Swiss recipe from the canton of Schwyz that I’ve adapted to be dairy-free: Benediktinereintopf Kloster Einsiedeln (Benedictine Stew from Einsiedeln Abbey). It’s a hearty Swiss-style meal that can be made relatively quickly, with a little chopping done beforehand. So far, I’ve served it with mashed potatoes (which most of us prefer) and elbow macaroni (which my son with food allergies prefers). Surprisingly, it’s a dairy-free cheese that makes this dish work!


Einsiedeln Abbey

Our family visited the Einsiedeln Abbey this summer, where the Benedictine Stew apparently originated, but the torrents of rain prevented us from having a leisurely visit. We still enjoyed our time there, but I would love to return someday during the holiday season for the town’s famed Christmas market, as the Abbey makes a dramatic backdrop to the festive stalls of craft makers and food vendors.

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Einsiedeln Abbey in the pouring rain, July 2014

The current Monastery and Abbey Church in Einsiedeln were constructed in the 18th century, but religious pilgrims have been visiting this site for over a thousand years. The courtyard include stables for the historic Einsiedeln breed of horses. The boys would have loved seeing them, but it was raining so hard that day, none of us wanted to venture out across the courtyard!

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Courtyard of the Einsiedeln Abbey; stables in the background

Back home after our trip, I came across the Benedictine Stew recipe in my Betty Bossi cookbook. Other than it being from the Einsiedeln Abbey, I haven’t learned much else about this Swiss dish. Although, I saw the Jewish Museum Berlin has a recipe online for a cheese soup served at the Abbey on “minor fasting days,” with leeks as a suggested addition. If you know anything else about the Benedictine Stew, please let me know!

The Betty Bossi recipe calls for a soft cheese with herbs, like Boursin. Instead, I substituted a dairy-free alternative: CreamyRisella, a soft Italian cheese made from brown rice. For the herbs, I just added some fresh tarragon. If you can use real cheese in this recipe, you should! However, if you’re like us and need to avoid milk-based products because of an allergy, CreamyRisella is a very good alternative.

Benedictine stew ingredients


Benedictine Stew

Recipe adapted from Betty Bossi’s “The Swiss Cookbook” (Zurich, 2010).

Ingredients:

400 grams ground beef
1-2 tablespoons dairy-free margarine
400 grams leeks, cuts into thin strips lengthwise (or into rounds—it’s easier and tastes the same!)
3 small onions, finely chopped
500 ml vegetable broth
200 grams CreamyRisella (or another very soft dairy-free cheese)
1 tablespoons finely chopped fresh tarragon

Instructions:

1. Brown the ground beef in a large pan. Remove the beef and set aside. Drain the fat from the pan.

2. Add 1-2 tablespoons of dairy-free margarine to the same pan, and sweat the leeks and onions slowly for about 5-10 minutes over medium heat.

3. Pour the vegetable broth over the leeks and return the ground beef to the pan. Bring to a boil, and then reduce the heat. Cover and simmer for about 15 minutes.

4. Stir in the CreamyRisella (or other cheese substitute) and tarragon, over medium heat, until both are fully incorporated and the dish is heated throughout. Serve immediately over your choice of an accompaniment: allergy-friendly boiled or mashed potatoes or elbow macaroni.

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The Swiss holiday, Jeûne Fédéral, is this weekend, so I’ll be making a Tarte aux Pruneaux to celebrate. Bon week-end, everyone!

Allergy-Friendly Restaurants in Switzerland: Seeking Your Recommendations

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Dairy/egg-free meal at Grindelwald’s Hotel Belvedere

During a rare meal out at a restaurant last month, my son raised up his arms and cheered loudly at the table—with a fork in one hand and a knife in the other. He really liked his fish, and was pretty excited about having a meal in a restaurant. Although, I can’t help but wonder if he was just glad to not be eating my cooking! Either way, it was a nice moment on our vacation that I won’t soon forget.

Have you ever been served a delicious allergy-friendly meal, carefully prepared by a restaurant in Switzerland? This most recent meal was at the Hotel Belvedere‘s restaurant in Grindelwald. With a lot of advanced preparation and emails back and forth, my son enjoyed a safe meal made without dairy and eggs. We were all very happy to be there—even though I can never fully relax when my son eats a meal I didn’t prepare myself.

Based on our experiences, and those of others living and traveling with food allergies in Switzerland, I’m constantly adding to my list of allergy-friendly restaurants and accommodations. For example, I just received an email last week with a new restaurant recommendation for Zurich: Widder Restaurant.

If you have places to recommend, please leave a comment below or send me an email. We can learn so much from each other. This information is helpful to our family and for so many others living with food allergies and intolerances. I really appreciate your help!

I’ll be offline for the next two weeks until school starts, as we’re taking a short vacation with family visiting from the United States. As usual, I hope to discover some new Swiss foods while we’re traveling. Thanks to you all for your continued support!

Recipe: Salade Estivale for Summertime

The signs of summer are apparent here in Switzerland. Outdoor music festival season started locally with Festi’neuch. Swiss summer trail racing is also underway, and I’ll be attempting my first one next weekend. Most importantly, my son’s summer vacation from school starts in one week. And in terms of food, I’ve noticed restaurants around town are advertising their summertime salads or salades estivales.

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My research indicates there’s no set rule for making a Swiss salade estivale, other than it should contain some sort of fresh summertime vegetables. Since I’m always trying to get my boys to eat more vegetables, we’ll be making lots of salads again during our summer vacation. The first Swiss salad recipe I’ve been making this summer is appropriately named Salade estivale, which I came across a while back in one of my Suisse romande cookbooks.

With seven vegetables to choose from in this salad, my boys tend to pick out the ones they like and leave the rest, but I still try to see it as progress. I was reminded this week by registered dietician Julia Marriott of Alimentary Bites that when it comes to serving vegetables to picky eaters, “perseverance and patience” are the only way. As with many salad recipes, the directions below serve as a guide, so feel free to swap in your favorite vegetables or mess with the quantities a bit, depending on the preferences in your household.


Salade Estivale

Adapted from Les recettes de Grand-Mère, Tome 4. Published in 2010 by the Association Alzheimer Suisse, Yverdon-les-Bains.

(dairy/egg/nut-free)

Salad:
1 cup kohlrabi, peeled and diced
1 cup carrots, peeled and diced
1 cup potatoes or sweet potatoes, peeled and diced
1 cup corn kernels, fresh or frozen
1 cup green beans, chopped
1 cup red pepper, diced
1 cup peas, frozen

Dressing:
4 tablespoons colza/canola/rapeseed oil
3 tablespoons white wine vinegar
2 tablespoons parsley, finely chopped
2 tablespoons chives, finely chopped
1 tablespoon tarragon, finely chopped
1 tablespoon soy yogurt
salt and pepper, to taste

1. Make the dressing. Put all the ingredients in a sealed jar and shake vigorously. Add salt and pepper to taste. Set aside.

2. Cook the vegetables. Bring a pot of water to a rolling boil and cook kohlrabi, carrots and potatoes together until fork tender, about 5-10 minutes. While these vegetables are cooking, use a steamer basket to steam the corn, green beans, red pepper and peas, just until tender. Do not overcook.

3. Put all the warmed vegetables in a large bowl and toss gently with the desired amount of dressing. Sprinkle with some fresh herbs and serve immediately, while still warm.

Salade Estival Sign

 I’m always grateful for the good advice and support of other food allergy parents. Many thanks to you all, and bon week-end!

Recipe: Kohlrabi and Carrot Salad

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I served a lunchtime salad today with a new vegetable for the kids: kohlrabi, or chou-pomme (cabbage-apple) in French. It’s apparently one of the first spring vegetables in Switzerland. We see it all over our farmers’ market this time of year, but I didn’t feel compelled to buy any until I saw a recipe calling for kohlrabi and carrots.

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Instead of cooking the vegetables for the salad, as the recipe called for, I peeled and grated the raw kohlrabi and left them that way. Also, I cheated and bought two bags of pre-grated carrots from Coop, so it all came together rather quickly.

It seems like I’m throwing almonds in everything I make these days, following my son’s successful food challenge. Keeping with this trend, I sprinkled some toasted almonds on top, which I thought were a nice addition.

While the boys were hesitant to try a kohlrabi salad, the carrots certainly helped make it more appealing. I could definitely see us bringing it on a picnic or two this summer. Like my celery root salad, it reminds me of an American-style cole slaw—minus the mayonnaise and other dairy-based ingredients.


Kohlrabi and Carrot Salad

Recipe adapted from Migroscuisine de saison.
Serves 4-6

(dairy/egg-free)

Salad:
6 cups raw carrots, grated
6 cups raw kohlrabi, grated
1 bunch of fresh mint, roughly chopped

Dressing:
4 tablespoons canola oil
2 tablespoons cider vinegar
1 tablespoon Dijon mustard
1/4 cup apple juice

salt and freshly ground pepper, to taste
Optional: toasted almonds

1. Whisk together all the dressing ingredients in a small bowl.

2. In a large bowl, combine the salad ingredients. Add the dressing to the salad, combining until well incorporated. Add salt and pepper, to taste.

3. In a small frying pan, toast some thinly sliced almonds over high heat, tossing them frequently, until they become fragrant and very lightly browned. Sprinkle on top of the salad.

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How do you prepare kohlrabi? What are your favorite kohlrabi recipes? Please leave a comment below or send me an email with the details. Bon week-end, all.

 

Petits Pains with Bear’s Garlic

Even though it snowed yesterday, there’s a sign that spring is on its way: ail des ours (bear’s garlic). Bear’s garlic supposedly got its name from les Germains (Germanic people). They thought this plant gave bear-like strength to whoever consumed it, since it’s a popular plant for these powerful animals to eat in the springtime, post-hibernation. After learning about this local herb last year, I first used it for an allergy-friendly pesto with pumpkin seeds. There are many ways you can cook this versatile plant, but this year I wanted to try it in savory petits pains for summer sandwiches.

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I remembered the place where our friend took us last spring to pick bear’s garlic, and sure enough, we found a large patch of fresh green leaves poking out of the ground about 2 weeks ago (see this map for where to find bear’s garlic in Switzerland). If you don’t have a place to pick your own, I also saw vendors at the local farmers’ market selling it, and even our local Coop is selling large packages of this fragrant herb.

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We picked the bear’s garlic before it started flowering, which seems to be the typical practice—when the leaves are still young and relatively fresh. If you can’t find bear’s garlic where you live, I think chives would make a good substitute for the recipe below.

Please note: If you’re planning to forage for wild bear’s garlic, you must be very careful and make sure you’re picking the right stuff! At this time of year, other plants are sprouting that look similar to bear’s garlic, but are toxic. The Centre Suisse d’Information Toxicologique has some helpful information, which you need to review if you’re planning to eat the wild plants.

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Petits Pains with Bear’s Garlic

Recipe adapted from swissmilk (see p. 3).
Makes 8 rolls.

(dairy/egg/nut-free)

500 grams all-purpose flour
1 1/2 teaspoons salt
1 teaspoon sugar
7 grams active dry yeast
250 ml very warm water
75 ml olive oil
1-2 tablespoons bear’s garlic (or chives), finely chopped

1. In a large bowl, whisk together the flour and salt.

2. Separately, stir together the warmed water, sugar and yeast. Let set for about 5 minutes until the yeast dissolves.

3. Make a trough in the center of the flour mixture, and pour in the yeast mixture and olive oil. Stir together until a dough forms. Knead the dough for about 5 minutes until it becomes smooth and elastic. Place in a covered bowl and let the dough rise for about an hour, until doubled in size.

4. Punch down the dough, and then divide into eight equal pieces. Form into small rolls and place on a pan lined with parchment paper. Cover with a towel and let rise again for about 20 minutes.

5. Using a sharp knife, cut an “X” on top of the roll and sprinkle with a little flour.

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6. Bake in an oven heated to 230°C/450°F for 10 minutes, and then reduce to 180°C/350°F and cook for another 5 minutes until the rolls are nicely browned.

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Last week, I made these petits pains for a picnic lunch at our local botanic garden and for American-style hamburgers at home. This recipe makes a small batch. You can throw them together very quickly and with few ingredients. I’ll be using them a lot now for outdoor lunches and when we’re traveling.

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What do you make with bear’s garlic? Do you buy it or pick it yourself? Please leave a comment below if you have tips or recipes to share. Thanks so much!

Also, this Thursday is Switzerland’s Journée Nationale de l’Allergie 2014 (National Day of Allergy 2014), sponsored by aha! Centre d’Allergie Suisse. I’ll have more information later this week, so stay tuned. 

Spaghetti with Barba di Frate

Beautiful spring weather means a new crop of spring veggies, including something I thought looked like seaweed at our local market. Its shape resembles a thick chive, but looks more like a succulent plant that might even grow under water. When I asked about it, the store clerk told me it tasted like spinach and is often served with pasta.

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Back at home, I searched for more information about this mystery vegetable. For starters, I found out it’s known by many names. At my local Suisse romande market, the sign for it was labeled with one of at least three Italian names: barba di frate.

Name Language
salsola soda Latin
barba di frate, agretti, roscano Italian
saltwort, barilla English
barbe de moine French
mönchsbart German

The barba di frate I bought came from Italy. It’s typically found in salty, coastal areas of Southern Europe, such as along the Mediterranean Sea. If you want to grow it yourself, you don’t need to be in Italy though; it looks like you can buy seeds from various online sources.

Besides eating barba di frate as a vegetable, people once used this plant to make “impure” sodium carbonate (barilla) for soap and glass, for example. In terms of taste, I think it does have a mild, but somewhat salty flavor that certainly reminds me of eating seaweed.

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Everything I read about this springtime delicacy said to serve it with lemon and olive oil. With this in mind, I immediately thought of a recent favorite recipe from the Food Allergy Mama, “Spaghetti with Garlic Oil.” Using this recipe as a guide, I incorporated barba di frate into an easy weekday supper. If you can’t find it though, you could substitute another quick-cooking green like spinach.

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Spaghetti with Barba di Frate

16 oz./450 grams spaghetti
1 bunch of barba di frate, trimmed and rinsed (or a couple handfuls of baby spinach)
1/4 cup olive oil
2 garlic cloves, finely chopped
1 lemon, freshly squeezed juice from one half and zest from the whole thing
kosher salt and pepper, to taste

Cook pasta in boiling water, as instructed on the package. During the last 2 minutes or so of cooking, put the barba di frate in the boiling water with the pasta.

While the pasta is cooking, simmer the garlic in the olive oil over low-to-medium heat for at least 5-7 minutes. The garlic can lightly brown a bit, but just don’t let it get dark brown or burn.

When the pasta and barba di frate is finished cooking, drain it in a colander and place it in a large bowl. Toss it with the warmed olive oil and garlic mixture, the lemon juice and zest and salt and pepper. Serve immediately.

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While spring has arrived to Switzerland, along with lots of new fresh produce to discover, I’ve heard rumors of snow this weekend… We’ll enjoy the beautiful weather again today, while we can. I hope spring flowers, like the daffodils below, are blooming (or will be blooming soon) wherever you are.

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If you’re looking for more recipes, Swiss travel info and other food allergy news from Dairy-Free Switzerland, you can follow me on Facebook, Twitter or Pinterest. Thanks for your continued support. Bon week-end!

“C’est horrible, les endives!”

For his 6th birthday, my son received a wonderful book in French called, “Emile et invisible.” This funny book follows Emile as he tries to avoid eating les endives for lunch by making himself invisible. Emile’s mother tries to make the bitter endives more palatable by smothering them in ham and gruyère, but he still isn’t convinced.

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Endive in Switzerland

According to the Union maraîchère suisse (Swiss vegetable union), the first endive in Switzerland was grown in 1909 in the Geneva region. That seemed relatively recent to me, until I learned about how endive is grown (in the dark) and how it started. The prevailing story of endive’s birth claims it was accidentally discovered by a Belgian farmer, who was storing chicory roots in his cellar. When he noticed the white buds growing from the thick roots, modern endive had arrived.

Today, about 80 percent of the Switzerland’s endive is grown in the canton of Vaud. In German-speaking Switzerland, you’ll find fresh endive used in salads, particularly during the winter months. Cooked endive is more common in French-speaking Switzerland, or Suisse romande, where we live. The process of cooking endive helps remove some of its bitter taste, which certainly helps, but unfortunately that means you lose its fresh crisp texture.

Before last week, I had very limited experience preparing endive. I typically ate them raw and in salads, most often with cheese and nuts. So, when I saw an easy recipe for braised endive in a French-cooking magazine that I could (hopefully) make dairy-free, I figured I would give it a try—even though my boys were less than thrilled.

I was happy with the result, and the recipe below is quick and easy—especially if you’re new to cooking endive and just want to try it out. Also, feel free to double the recipe, if you’re cooking for people who will actually eat it (this is not the case in my home just yet!).

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Braised Endives à l’Orange

Recipe adapted from Saveurs magazine, N°208.

Serves 2-3 people.

(dairy/egg/nut-free)

4 heads of endive
1 tablespoon dairy-free margarine
1 orange (half for zest, all for juice)
1 tablespoon of honey

1. Zest about half an orange, and squeeze the juice out of the whole thing. Whisk together half the orange juice with the zest and honey. Set aside, along with the reserved orange juice.

2. Remove outer leaves, if necessary from the endive. Rinse the endive in cold water. Slice off the stems, and then cut them in half, lengthwise.

3. Melt the dairy-free margarine in a large pan. Cook the endive over medium heat for about 3 minutes. Then, pour over the orange and honey mixture and cook the endive for another 10 minutes on medium to medium-low heat.

4. Pour over the remaining orange juice, add salt and pepper, and cook the endive for 5 minutes, so the sauce becomes slightly thickened. Serve immediately.

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Similar to lentils, I’m hoping to discover some kid-friendly recipes for endive. How do you prepare this bitter vegetable? Cooked or raw?